Colours & Emotion For October 2016

Colours & Emotion
  1. While many infographics claim colour psychology as grounds for our day-to-day choices, newer research claims that we might not be exposed to colour psychology in its purest form thereby making any such association weak. Personal preferences, conditioning, experiences from childhood and associations that we continue making as we grow up all have an effect on how we perceive colours later on. Thus, while specific colours are used to evoke certain kinds of emotion, the guarantee that the colour Yellow will always make you happy, is not there.

  2. Throughout time, artists have varied in their usage of hues and shades according to basic factors like its availability or economic constraints and also according to their belief in how colour or the extent of its usage affected the end result. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood were part of the literary and artistic movement which believed in the most intense use of words, colours and details to evoke as realistic a picture as possible in the minds of the viewer. They created art particularly famous for its colourful brilliance unlike what was taught at the Royal Academy of Art which emphasized shadows over colour.

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Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

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Colours &
Nature

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

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Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

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Colours &
Fashion

Colours & Fashion For October 2016

Colours & Fashion

Even as far back as the Renaissance, people did not just wear outfits of any colour. Red was limited to high ranking nobles, the Church - as a symbol of authority, and judges. Orange was preferred by middle class merchants and peasants who attempted to imitate the nobility with cheaper orange dyes. The Renaissance believed that green represented young love, joy and chastity. A young woman of marriageable age was expected to wear light blue but turquoise was a sure sign of jealousy. Lastly, greys were the shade of poverty and black was exclusively worn to depict solemnity and mourning!

 

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Gems For October 2016

Colours & Gems
  1. Contrary to popular belief, not all pink or red stones are rubies. There exists an extremely precious mineral called Poudrettite. This gemstone was first discovered in Mont. St. Hilaire, Quebec, Canada. It is names after the Poudrette family in whose quarry the gem was found first. It wasn't documented as a gem till 1986 and the first actual gem quality Poudrettite was found in Burma. It is a beautiful, transparent gem and is a very pale, pink colour.

  2. The colour amber is usually associated with honey or the description of a sunset. But amber is also a precious gemstone and is one of a kind since it is one of the few gemstones of organic origin! It is found in the Baltic region, where it was first discovered 50 million years ago. The gemstone is the fossilized form of a soft, sticky, tree resin. It is extremely light-weight, and can float in salt water. Common colours for this gemstone are from a deep yellow-brown to a pale white. Black and brown amber are found too!

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Nature For October 2016

Colours & Nature
  1. Human beings are 100% part of nature and in fact our bodies do get decomposed after death. But did you know that our ground up remains can serve a purpose too? The colour "Mummy Brown" is an actual hue made from the dug up and ground remains of mummies in Ancient Egypt and was used right up to the mid-19th Century where-in we were fresh out of mummy remains. What now remains is just the memory of the lengths we can go to get the colour of our choice.

  2. You may admire birds all you want, but a lot of times, their colours aren't natural but the effect of what they eat! The Red Cardinal is red because carotenoids from the berries it consumes go and settle in its feathers. Flamingos owe their brilliant pink colour to a diet of shrimps. These shrimps' carotenoids are further processed in the flamingos to produce the shades of pink and orange that we are familiar with!

Rate This

There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion