Colours & Emotion For May 2018

Colours & Emotion
  1. When we feel different emotions, have you noticed the subtle colour changes on the face? The blood flows in the face, changing the colour that other people can notice. In fact, according to a new research, people can properly identify someone's emotions from these colour changes up to 75% of the time. Isn't that fascinating? This means that being "blue in the face" with anger holds more truth than just being an old idiom.

  2. In the hot climate of Australia, you will observe that most buildings are coloured blue or green.
    This is psychological, as it is thought to make people think that the environment they are in is cooler and pleasant. On the other hand, in Europe, bright primary colours are used to create a warm ambiance owing to the long winters and colder climate. In the hot Mediterranean where summers have high temperatures, plenty of homes and villas are white in colour. This is to reflect as much sunlight as possible away from the building to keep the rooms inside cool. The window frames in these building are coloured light blue. This is known as the Mediterranean colour scheme.

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Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

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Colours &
Nature

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

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Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

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Colours &
Fashion

Colours & Fashion For May 2018

Colours & Fashion

The popularity of nautical style in society can be traced back to Queen Victoria. She was the one who served as an inspiration and the trend of wearing white with blue stripes became widespread. In 1846, Queen Victoria had a child's sailor uniform made on board the royal yacht for her son Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales.

The nautical influence in fashion made into the wardrobes of high society women by the 1800s and remains a favourite till date.

 

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

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Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Gems For May 2018

Colours & Gems
  1. Rhodolite Garnet gets its name from the Greek word, "rhodon", meaning "rose coloured", which refers to its pinkish hue and rose-like appearance. The name "garnet" comes from the Medieval Latin word, "granatum", which is an adjective that means "dark-red". It is a form of Garnet that has a lighter tone and more purplish colour than the typical Garnet gemstones. It is a variety between the Almandine and Pyrope series, usually containing more of magnesium than iron in its chemical structure. This is the reason it is often regarded as a variety of Pyrope.

  2. Sardonyx has been found in plenty of locations such as Brazil, Germany, India, Uruguay, Russia and USA, but it is believed that the best gemstone comes from India. This stone is a type of striped or banded Chalcedony, and is a mixture of Onyx and Orange Carnelian. It is also known as Sardian Onyx and has a less defined mix of colours. It is believed to be a highly protective stone with metaphysical properties worn for happiness, confidence and optimism. The stone is considered to boost self-control and is good for someone who is studying or in a profession where mental discipline is required.

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

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Colours &
Emotion

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Nature For May 2018

Colours & Nature
  1. Wattle-cup Caterpillar
    Have you ever seen a Wattle-cup caterpillar before? It may look like something enveloped in a sweet wrapper, however, don't be fooled by its appearance. It has an acid-yellow body that is covered with protruding spikes that are known as tubercles that can puncture three times as painful as a bee sting! The caterpillar is a native of Australia and looks like this only for a few weeks, after which it transforms into a dull brown moth.

  2. Blue-ringed Octopus
    Meet the blue-ringed octopus. In addition to being one of the most brightly-coloured creatures in the sea, the blue-ringed octopus is also one of the most deadly species in the world. Its venom is present in its saliva, and it is deadly enough to kill an adult human being! It has bright blue or black rings that look extremely striking and change its colour dramatically when it is threatened. Just 12 to 20 centimetres in size, it spends most of its time hiding in crevices of the coral reefs and rock pools of the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean.

Rate This

There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion