Colours & Emotion For February 2020

Colours and Emotions
  1. Dark cloudy sky & trees

    Colour can be a powerful way to convey emotion in your artwork or your illustration. It can be used to create a literal mood, be it a sombre grey rainy scene or a cheerful bright yellow breakfast corner in a kitchen. It can be used figuratively to evoke emotion via characters and objects. If you want to create a setting of romance and desire, use red tones to set the scene. It doesn't have to be between characters. Using the colour red can also imply a passion for a thing such as a character's passion for music.

  2. Young couple standing scenery

    Painters usually convey their emotions through their artwork using colours and colour combination. In terms of conveying emotion through work, the 17th century Italian painter Caravaggio was a master. If you look at this Baroque artist’s body of work, you will notice immediately how dark it is. The background of the painting is often black with just a warm glow over the figures in the scene. Even if you are not familiar with the stories depicted in these paintings, which are often biblical, you can feel the intensity of the scene simply because of the colour preferences of the artist. This style was very much unique to Caravaggio and worked as an inspiration for other artists such as Rembrandt, Rubens and Velazquez.

Rate This

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion

Colours & Fashion For February 2020

Colours  Fashion Banner

Fashion Colour Ideas

Have you heard of colour blocking? Colour blocking is when colours that are opposites on the colour wheel are paired together for an interesting and complementary colour combination. The process of colour blocking is as simple as it sounds - adding blocks of solid colours to one outfit. It is commonly associated in fashion as a trend that originated from the artwork of Piet Mondrian, a Dutch painter. In the fashion world, it first began with a dress by Yves St. Laurent way back in 1946. Yves St. Laurent was inspired by Mondrian's work and brought to life his colour blocking idea through an iconic dress with Mondrian's name. How about trying this colour blocking look? You can also try wall paint in two contrasting shades for your favourite walls to create a statement.

 

Rate This

There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Gems For February 2020

Colours  Gems Banner
  1. Demantoid Garnet

    Demantoid Garnet

    You are looking at Demantoid Garnet, which is the rarest of all the garnet varieties. It is considered valuable by collectors for its exceptional brilliance. The rarest and most precious Demantoid is from Russia, and only the Russian material is valuable in the eyes of serious gem investors. Demantoid garnet is found mostly in small sizes, with most stones below 1 carat. This gemstone is believed to help remove obstacles that come in the way of love. It is a wonderful crystal for married couples who also work together to keep harmony in the relationship. Isn’t it lovely?

  2. Tsavorite

    Tsavorite

    The gemstone in the picture is known as Tsavorite. It is a rare member of the garnet family and a new member in the jewellery market. As it is a garnet, it is the birthstone for the month of January. It is a rich, deep green emerald coloured garnet though it is also seen in different shades of colours like yellow.

    It was discovered in Tsavo National Park, Kenya, in 1967 by Campbell Bridges, and was introduced to the trade in the 1970s. It was named by Tiffany's Henry Platt, along with Campbell Bridges in 1974. It looks similar to an emerald but is more brilliant and durable. As this gemstone is not quite popular, it is far less expensive than an emerald. The gemstone is in demand more by collectors and connoisseurs, than by the general public.

Rate This

There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Nature For February 2020

Colours and Nature
  1. Turquoise-browed motmot

    Turquoise-browed Motmot
    The bird in the picture is known as Turquoise-browed Motmot. It is one of the most flamboyantly plumaged birds. You can see this bird in the Yucatán Peninsula of Eastern Mexico and Northernmost Guatemala, and on the Pacific slope of Middle America, from Southern Mexico south to Northwest Costa Rica. It has olive-green underparts with a cinnamon-coloured belly, and a darker reddish patch near its head. The most eye-catching feature is its turquoise feathers just like the eyebrows that contrast with the black mask. It has a long graduated bright blue tail, which has the central feathers twice as long as the rest. So many striking colours, right?

  2. Malabar Banded Peacock

    Malabar Banded Peacock
    What you are looking at is the Malabar Banded Peacock. It is a dazzling butterfly belonging to the group papilionidae which mainly consist of large butterflies. It has a beautiful green and an eye- catchy shiny aqua green band with a beautiful tail. The underside also shows an orange spot on the hind wing area. It is mostly found in Kerala in India during October to February. You can find this butterfly in the lush dense forest areas or places with dense vegetation in fruit-bearing trees. The butterfly displays its coloured wings to ward off predators.

Rate This

There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion