Colours & Emotion For August 2019

Colours & Emotion
  1. Have you ever wondered why blues music is called so? The name of this American music may have originated with the 17th century English expression “the blue devils,” for the intense visual hallucinations that may come with severe alcohol withdrawal. It was shortened over time to “the blues,” and came to mean a state of depression or agitation. According to a research done by the University of California, Berkeley, our brains are wired to make music and colour connections based on how the melodies make us feel. Fascinating, isn’t all this, to the ears?

  2. Israel Abramov, a behavioural scientist asked men and women to break down the hue of a colour and to assign a percentage to the categories red, green, yellow and blue. The outcome – Women were more adept at differentiating between subtle gradations compared to men. This sensitivity was most evident in the middle of the colour spectrum. Women were able to distinguish tiny differences between colours that looked the same to men. In fact, Abramov saw that a somewhat longer wavelength of light was needed for men to see the same hues as women – hues identified as orange by women were seen as more yellow by men.

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Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

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Colours &
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Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

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Colours & Fashion For August 2019

Colours & Fashion

Gingham print has been around since several centuries all around the globe. The actual word “gingham” was introduced to the English language way back in the 17th century. It was used to describe a striped fabric imported from India. But over time, the more familiar checked pattern took over. Did you know that the word "Gingham" comes from the Malayan word genggang or "striped"? It is marked by having the coloured yarns (the warp) going against the uncoloured yarns (the weft) to create a light-weight texture on both sides, making it essentially reversible.

 

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Gems For August 2019

Colours & Gems
  1. Pyrite
    Take a look at this beautiful gemstone. Don’t be fooled by its appearance. It has been called “Fool’s Gold”, because of its superficial resemblance to gold. It occurs as a mesmerising intersection of cubic crystals. It is known to be useful in enhancing willpower when you want to get rid of bad habits. It is believed to be beneficial for students as it helps them focus and concentrate on their studies. Pyrite is named after the Greek word “pyr” meaning fire. It is known so because in the olden days, it was used to create sparks to start a fire.

  2. Apophyllite
    This gemstone is known as Apophyllite. It lets you be proactive against anxiety by pinpointing its destructive qualities with the energy of calm. The wearer can get rid of overactive thoughts, negative patterns and repressed emotions using Apophyllite. You can redirect your attention from the mind to the body with the help of this gemstone. The gemstone is believed to cleanse the third eye and crown chakras and bring your attention to breathing in peace and exhaling negativity. In fact, it is considered one of the best healing stones in Reiki.

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

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Colours &
Emotion

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion

Nature has bestowed us with exquisite colours, click here to discover the wonders of colour in nature.

Read More

Colours &
Nature

Colours & Nature For August 2019

Colours & Nature
  1. Richmond Birdwing Butterfly
    Take a look at this beautiful creature. It is the Richmond birdwing, one of the largest Australian butterflies. It has a wingspan of up to 13 cm in males and 15 cm in females. This species is featured as Vulnerable in Queensland in the Nature Conservation Act 1992. The male butterfly distinctively differs from the female in appearance. The males have a black forewing with a striking, iridescent green fore-edge while the females have grey or brown wings. The female butterfly lays her eggs on a plant called the Richmond Birdwing Vine, which gives it its name.

  2. Coleus
    Look at this plant. Isn’t it striking? Although coleus does flower, it is popular for its brightly-coloured quilt-like leaves and rightly so! The plant requires plenty of water and grows in sun to partial shade. It reaches 20 to 24 inches but its trailing types can be used in hanging pots. You can use coleus indoors as a potted plant in a sunny window or outdoors in part sun. In fact, it is hard to go wrong with this plant. It looks best when planted in groups and does not attract any insects.

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There can't be a better language for emotions than colours, click here to explore.

Read More

Colours &
Emotion

Gems and colours are intricately related; find out more about their association here.

Read More

Colours &
Gems

Fashion and colours go hand in hand, discover the secrets of this connection and up your style quotient here.

Read More

Colours &
Fashion